Al Kader Oasis Newsletter July 2016
July 2016
Archive

Events
07/25   Stated Meeting
08/06   EW Football
08/13   Run for a Child
08/18   Golf Tournament
08/28   Family Picnic
09/12   Stated Meeting
09/24   Social
11/11   Fall Ceremonial

Al Kader Shrine Center
25100 SW Parkway Avenue
Wilsonville, OR 97070-9600

Phone: 503-682-4420
FAX: 503-685-5080

Al Kader Shrine Center Directions Map
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Al Kader Oasis Newsletter July 2016
July 2016
Oasis Archive


Al Kader Shrine Center
25100 SW Parkway Avenue
Wilsonville, OR 97070-9600

Phone: 503-682-4420
FAX: 503-685-5080

Contact Us
Membership Petition

4 Flags

Facebook Logo

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Museum History

Shriners Fraternal Seal

News

Noble Bill Blankenship
July 2016

Masons today would have us believe that Masonry is politically and religiously neutral. “Under the usual Masonic restrictions” is part of our oath today, and is meant to set a standard of propriety during our properly “tiled” meetings.

What is often ignored is the historic record of Freemasonry that not only was the hotbed of political action, but in fact was instrumental in bringing about revolutions against all forms of tyranny, including the American revolution.

When we meet together as brothers in Masonry and conduct the ancient rituals of Lodge meetings, we do recognize the “meeting on the level” where all Masons are equal and where brotherly love prevails. However, we should also recognize that as “Free” Masons, that we are dedicated to the spirit of ancient Masons who were in fact “Free” of the tyranny of Kings, Priests and tyrannies where men were slaves and subjects to those political states.

Today, Freemasons recognize that those ancient founders of our order were Free because of the education they received in a world of ignorance, and we have sought to bring this education to the masses of our nation of which we are citizens. However, again, this comes with a caveat itself, and that is the purpose of education, the paramount purpose of creating a citizenry that is centered on becoming responsible and informed citizens, capable of fulfilling the promise of “being able to govern themselves.”

This following article speaks of our early Freemason revolutionists who took on the responsibility of creating a new nation, Under God and with Liberty for all, breaking the chains of Kings, Priests and tyrannical governments.


Edward M. Gair

The Boston Tea Party and Freemasonry
An artist drew a picture of the Green Dragon Tavern. Below it he wrote these words:

“Where we met to Plan the Consignment of a few Shiploads of Tea, Dec 16, 1773”

In the upper left hand corner of his drawing he put a square and compass. To this day no one knows who planned the Boston Tea Party.

The building had been purchased by the St. Andrews Lodge in 1764. There was a square and compass over the front door and a copper Dragon that had turned green through the weather. It was a community center. Downstairs was the Tavern. Upstairs was the St. Andrews Lodge and the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts (Ancients). It was the largest place for meetings in the north east end of Boston. Historians have called it “headquarters of the American Revolution.”

History - The Fez

Here the Boston Committee of Correspondence was formed after a few initial meetings at Brother Joseph Warren’s house a few doors away. Here the Sons of Liberty held secret sessions. They wore a jewel around their necks and were known to have a separate language for recognition. The jewel had a picture of the Liberty Tree on it.

The North End Caucus formed the guard here that publicly guarded the tea ships so no tea could be unloaded. Brother Edward Proctor (St. Andrews Lodge) was known to be leader of this guard. Brother Paul Revere served with this guard. Later Brother Paul Revere served in another guard called the Selectmen who walked the streets of Boston, two by two, and observed the movements of British troops before he went off on his famous ride to Lexington. The Selectmen guard met at the Green Dragon Tavern and took an oath of secrecy over a Bible.

Dr. Joseph Warren, a 33 year old physician is the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts that meets upstairs. Paul Revere is the Senior Grand Deacon. Both are Past Masters of the St. Andrews Lodge. They are close friends and had come to the St. Andrews Lodge in the same year. It is Joseph Warren who sends Paul Revere to Lexington with a coded message for Brother John Hancock (also of St. Andrews Lodge).


Noble Bill Blankenship
March 2016

History: The Fez
When I have given talks about the history of Freemasonry and especially when speaking to groups that are sponsoring student Football players at our Shrine Football games, I like to present some colorful illustrations of the well known trademark of Shriner’s...the “Red Fez”. While I am wearing that “Fez” and attended by fellow Shriners, it is always well received by students when I explain what the “Fez” represents and how it came to be associated with Shriners. The usual story is surrounding the beginnings of the fraternity back in 1868... which was just after the Civil War, but also a time when much of the world was very interested in all things relating to Egyptian culture.

History - The Fez

Egypt at this time was an English “protectorate”... and there were well know pictures of Egyptian servants and officials wearing the “Red Fez”.... and from this Egyptian fascination developed the ritual and that well known hat. However, even more interesting is that the “Red Fez” was part of the uniform of one of the most famous Confederate Army Regiments....the “Louisiana Tigers”.

This famous New Orleans Militia Infantry Regiment were part of what were the “Zouaves” that wore a unique uniform that included the “Red Fez” complete with tassel... and of course, a chin strap. At the first battle of Bull Run, when Confederate troops were in defensive positions along that small river, Union troops attempted to turn the left flank of the Confederates... a young Regimental Commander, who was also a professor at VMI, commanded the Confederate left flank and was responsible for turning his regiment on line to block the Union advance ... this was of course, the man who became known as “Stonewall Jackson” and his brigade gained that name and kept it throughout the war. On the left flank of the “Stonewall Jackson” Brigade was a wild and unruly group of soldiers commanded by an officer named “Wheat”, and his men were called “Wheat’s Tigers.”

Yes, stripped Pantaloons and the Red Fez set these men apart ... when the Union Division advanced on line, they were met by massed fire from the Confederate muskets .... but then, when the lines were only about 40 yards apart ... “Wheat’s Tigers,” dropped their muskets, and pulled out the short swords that were also a part of their equipment ... and with wild yells, which later became known as the “Confederate Yell” they charged into the Union lines ... they broke through immediately and went into the rear against the officers on horseback and circled back against the Union front from the rear. The Confederate Army was saved by this wild brigade in their Red Fezes, and the Union attack collapsed and was driven back with heavy losses.

Now ... those early Shriner’s recognized the importance of the “Red Fez,” but with the Civil War just over ... it seemed that connecting that emblem to the Egyptian revival was a lot more politically correct than reminding the “Northeners” of that nearly invincible Confederate brigade ... the famous “Stonewall Jackson” brigade that had fought to the bitter end. Shriners wear that “Red Fez” not just as part of the Egyptian ritual of the fraternity, but also can be proudly aware that they wear them in memory of that most famous group of soldiers ... the “Tigers” of Louisiana.

By the way, that is also the reason for the “Tigers of LSU” the football power of the South – Louisiana State University Tigers in honor and memory of the “Stone Wall Jackson” Brigade.


Noble John Smith, Historian
February 2016

Brotherly Love and the Shriner Ring
Strokes left this once strong WM weak, silent and alone. He struggled to “talk” with his eyes and his few spoken words could not be understood. For the most part, his family members were his only visitors. His once “strong” Al Kader memories seemed gone and his wheelchair-confined body looked tired . We often shook hands to “tell” each other, with Brotherly Love, “Thank You”.

His memory had mostly gone and he likely did not recognize me, so I showed him my Shrine ring – he smiled and shook my hand, again.

History is more than the past. It is the present and future, too.


Noble John Smith, Historian
January 2016

Retirees Wanted!

Have you seen what’s going on upstairs? The History corner (office) is a mess, the bookcase is full, the photos are unlabeled, pins abound, uniforms hang, etc. In other words, History needs your help to organize - to identify unknown Shriners in photos, revise our uniforms, change the display cases, arrange pins, inventory, prepare displays for upcoming events, take-on special projects, and many other jobs.

Call Al Kader if you can help or 503-266-2163.

Recent donations include:

Web Harrington, P.P. - fez, fez case and badges, courtesy of his daughter

Hal Hermison - photos, pins, 1920 memorabilia

Bob Waliker, P.P. (on loan) - clown plates and clown statue

Anonymous - photos, books, pins, Rose Festival patch


2015

Noble John Smith, Historian
November 2015

"Daddy, Daddy-here come the Shriners"

Marching and playing proudly are the colorful and regal Al Kader Shriners. Bands are playing, Chanters are singing, horses are prancing and Patrols were drilling – and all for the children who, at least many of them, could not go to the parade.

Today, many of us are too old, too busy, etc. to take part. Shriners, until 1920, got together to have “fun”, only. Parades were a great and appropriate way to do this.

How exciting it was to hear the distant sounds of the Shriners band then catch a first glimpse of their beautifully decorated horses. Then, in the back of this mind whispered the idea – I want to be a Shriner someday!

They are just memories now. The vibrant colors replaced with the plainer, cooler and less expensive shirts, pants and shoes Shriners from foreign lands I had only heard stories of, such as Salem, Linn County and Eastern Oregon rarely come anymore. But I still thinks as though they all were marching as one just for me!


Noble John Smith, Historian
August 2015

1920-2020
Centennial Birthday
“Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children”

VITAL STATISTICS

Born: June 23, 1920
Birth City: Portland, Or.
Host: Al Kader

Birth Place:
46th Annual Imperial Council Session, A.A.O.N.M.S

Parents: All Nobles attending the meeting at which the vote took place.


1920 Imperial Session Questions

Clues are underlined

1. What local Shrine Temple hosted the session where the concept of a Shriners Hospital was adopted?

2. At what annual (after #46) Imperial Session was the Shrine Hospital system adopted? Where?

3. About how many were predicted to attend the Session? How many actually attended? How many of the 145 Temples were represented?

4. Was I.S. W. Freeland Kendrick the Imperial Potentate that year?

5. What was named after him? Where were they planted?

6. Name the park (now a sports field) at which many 1920 shows were held.

Answers:

(1) Al Kader (2) 47th, Des Moines (3) 60,000, 75,000+ , 145 (4) Yes (5) Rose, Rose Garden (6) Multnomah Field

About the photo: from vintageportland.wordpress.com; This elaborate Arch of Welcome was constructed in the intersection of SW 6th and Alder for the Imperial Session of Shriners in 1920. At that event, members unanimously passed a resolution to establish the Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children system. This view is to the north; the top of the Wells-Fargo building can be seen in the distance over the arch.


Noble John Smith, Historian
July 2015

Centennial in 2020

Was Rome built in a day? Did the pyramids just appear one day? They took years – and stand today.

The idea of a Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children took years before it came true. So we should start years before to celebrate the Centennial of that awesome event.

Fact #2

Astoria Shrine Club sent 20 men to the 1920 Session.

Pendleton Shrine Club sent 25-50 mounted paraders.

Fact #3

Over 60,000 Shriners from all over were expected.


Noble John Smith, Historian
June 2015

2020 is Coming to Al Kader!

2020 marks the 100th anniversary since a Shrine Hospital was first approved by the Nobles attending the 1920 Imperial Session hosted by Al Kader. The Temples in Tacoma and Spokane helped. The Shriners “foot was in the door” for healing many “friendless and crippled” children, regardless of race, religion, creed, sex, etc.

Al Kader thus has the responsibility, duty and honor to celebrate that event. That will come in 2020.

Some 1920 items are on display upstairs. Donate or loan 1920 Imperial Session items to Al Kader c/o “History”.

1920 Secret: The first Shriners Hospital began in St. Louis but its construction was delayed so the first to open was in Shreveport.


Noble John Smith, Historian
April 2015

This is the first in a series of Al Kader History Museum articles.

What ever type of Shriner you strive to be, these pages will lead you on a journey across our story in search of those wonderful “Temple Treasures” that help tell Al Kader Shrine’s tale.

You may discover them in a vintage picture (a), a meaningful item (b) or in a revealing text (c).

Regardless of where you may find them, your quest for that elusive final AL KADER SHRINE “oasis” will stop at many refreshing spots along the way. You will find different “stories” at each one. At the end of your caravan across our “desert”, you will discover the place where Al Kader Shrines treasures hide.

Al Kader Shriners Museum History


The Ancient Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine was founded in 1872 by a group of 13 men belonging to the Masonic Order. It was originally established to provide fun and fellowship for its members.

Al Kader Past Potentates

Al Kader History Slide Show

On January 3, 1888, Imperial Potentate Sam Briggs granted the dispensation for Al Kader Shrine. On February 15, 1888, members of Islam Shrine conferred the Shrine degrees in Portland, Oregon. There were fourteen original members.

Irving W. Pratt was elected the first Illustrious Potentate on February 15, 1888. Al Kader was the 46th charter and the first in the Pacific Northwest. Pratt’s great grandson, Noble Ard Pratt, is today an active Al Kader Shriner.

By 1900, over 80 Shrine chapters had been established. Since that time, 191 Shrine Centers have been established throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Panama.

The Imperial Council met in Portland, Oregon, in 1920. Al Kader Shriners and their delegation helped to write that indelible page in the Book of Humanity, and thus began the Shriners Hospitals for Children, for it was here that the movement to define our philanthropy began.

Since that time, for over 75 years, more than 700,000 children with orthopedic problems, burns and spinal cord injuries have been treated up to their 18th birthday, in a network of 22 hospitals providing pediatric specialty care, innovative research, and outstanding teaching programs for medical professionals.

Children up to age 18 with orthopaedic conditions, burns, spinal cord injuries, and cleft lip and palate are eligible for care and receive all services in a family-centered environment, regardless of the patients’ ability to pay. In 1924, the third Shriners hospital opened in Portland on NE 82nd Ave. Sandy Boulevard.

Eventually, it was decided to build a new facility within the Oregon Health Sciences medical complex, overlooking the downtown area from the West Hills, at a capital investment of over $25 million. The new hospital also includes a Research Center and specializes in orthopedic treatment and surgery. We are very fortunate to have one of the Shriners hospitals located in Portland.

In 2004, we celebrated the 80th anniversary of the founding of the Shriners hospital in Portland. The Al Kader Shriners Center was originally located in downtown Portland. In 1993, Al Kader moved the executive offices and Shriners Center to Wilsonville, Oregon, minutes south of the Portland metropolitan area. Our Wilsonville location affords more convenient access from the Interstate 5 freeway system, free parking, large meeting rooms, Harrington Hall, (a large dining hall for social events), and our storage building for most of our Unit’s motorized equipment.

A recently completed memorabilia room within our Center displays the rich history of Al Kader Shriners. You are welcome to visit the room when you visit us.

Nobles, their Ladies and the public are welcome to visit our Shrine Center Office Hours - 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM Pacific Time, Monday to Friday

Al Kader Shriners
Al Kader Shriners

Al Kader Shriners

Al Kader Oasis July 2016 Newsletter
July 2016
Oasis Archive

Events
07/25   Stated Meeting
08/06   EW Football
08/13   Run for a Child
08/18   Golf Tournament
08/28   Family Picnic
09/12   Stated Meeting
09/24   Social
11/11   Fall Ceremonial

Al Kader Shrine Center
25100 SW Parkway Avenue
Wilsonville, OR 97070-9600

Phone: 503-682-4420
FAX: 503-685-5080

Contact Us
Membership Petition

I.S. John Nerski Potentate 2016 emblem

4 Flags

Facebook Logo

Twitter logo